A Dictionary of Biology by M. Abercrombie; C. J. Hickman; M. L. Johnson

By M. Abercrombie; C. J. Hickman; M. L. Johnson

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Barbs. Of feathers. The filaments, in a row at each side of the longitudinal axis, which together make the expanded part (vane) of a feather. See Barbules. barbules. Of feathers. Minute filaments in a row at each side of a barb. Those of one side bear hooks, those of the other a groove. Barbules of adjacent barbs hook together and link barbs into a firm vane. Down-feathers and ostrich feathers have no interlocking mechanism, so their barbs are free. bark. g. when other layers tree trunks. Bark may of cork are formed at successively deeper levels within the cortex, it may consist of alternating layers of cork and dead cortex tissue, and may also include dead phloem tissue.

Barbs. Of feathers. The filaments, in a row at each side of the longitudinal axis, which together make the expanded part (vane) of a feather. See Barbules. barbules. Of feathers. Minute filaments in a row at each side of a barb. Those of one side bear hooks, those of the other a groove. Barbules of adjacent barbs hook together and link barbs into a firm vane. Down-feathers and ostrich feathers have no interlocking mechanism, so their barbs are free. bark. g. when other layers tree trunks. Bark may of cork are formed at successively deeper levels within the cortex, it may consist of alternating layers of cork and dead cortex tissue, and may also include dead phloem tissue.

Multiplication is by simple fission; other forms of asexual reproduction, by formation of aerially dispersed spores, flagellated swarmers, occur in some bacteria. Sexual reproduction has also been demonstrated in certain forms. g. a gram of soil may contain from a few thousand to several hundred million bacteria; a cubic centimetre of sour milk, many millions. Most bacteria are saprophytes or parasites. ), either obtaining energy by oxidation processes or from light in the presence of bacteriochlorophyll.

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