An Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology: An Introduction by Anatoly Liberman

By Anatoly Liberman

This paintings introduces popular linguistics student Anatoly Liberman’s entire dictionary and bibliography of the etymology of English phrases. The English etymological dictionaries released some time past declare to have solved the mysteries of note origins even if these origins were largely disputed. An Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology in contrast, discusses the entire present derivations of English phrases and proposes the simplest one.   within the inaugural quantity, Liberman addresses fifty-five phrases often brushed aside as being of unknown etymology. a number of the entries are one of the most typically used phrases in English, together with guy, boy, woman, chook, mind, comprehend, key, ever, and but. Others are slang: mooch, nudge, pimp, filch, gawk, and skedaddle. Many, equivalent to beacon, oat, hemlock, ivy, and toad, have existed for hundreds of years, while a few have seemed extra lately, for instance, slang, kitty-corner, and Jeep. they're all united through their etymological obscurity.   This designated source e-book discusses the most difficulties within the technique of etymological learn and comprises indexes of matters, names, and all the root phrases. every one access is a full-fledged article, laying off gentle for the 1st time at the resource of a few of the main largely disputed notice origins within the English language.   “Anatoly Liberman is likely one of the best students within the box of English etymology. unquestionably his paintings might be an essential device for the continued revision of the etymological section of the entries within the Oxford English Dictionary.” —Bernhard Diensberg, OED advisor, French etymologies   Anatoly Liberman is professor of Germanic philology on the collage of Minnesota. He has released many works, together with sixteen books, such a lot lately note Origins . . . and the way we all know Them: Etymology for everybody.

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The god Mannus was believed to be the progenitor of the human race. ’ The name Mannus seems to be of onomatopoeic origin, unless it is a baby word. MOOCH (1460) Mooch and its doublet miche are verbs of Germanic origin (miche is memorable because of Hamlet’s miching malico ‘sneaking mischief’). OE *my@can or *myccan meant *’conceal’ and had cognates in Old High German, Old Irish, and Latin. Those words referred to all kinds of underhand dealings and criminal activities. ’ Whatever the distant origin of mooch, the verb *my@can and its cognates have been part of European slang for at least two millennia.

Some choices have been xxx Introduction arbitrary. D. In the bibliography, some traditional abbreviations have been retained, for it seems that, for instance, PBB is still more familiar to most than BGDSL. If the reference is Mueller, Wedgwood, and so forth (this is done only for dictionaries), it means that all the editions of the respective works contain the same information on the matter in question. Skeat’s great 1882 dictionary was reset only for the 4th edition. Therefore, Skeat1 means Skeat1–3.

My@can). See curmudgeon and mug. Therefore, a search for the origin of hugger-mugger should probably begin with -mugger rather than -hugger. See mooch for the history of the root *my@c- and its variants. IVY (800) OE ı@fig has established cognates only in German (Efeu; OHG ebah and ebahewi) and Dutch (eiloof), though the name of the mythic river Ifing, known from Old Icelandic, may also be akin to it. ’ Ivy got its name because it was a bitter, pungent plant. ’ Ivy is not related to L ibex (as though both the plant and the animal were climbers).

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